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Haidemenopoulos, G.N.

Personal Information:

Position: Director Haidemenopoulos, G.N.
Research Area: Physical Metallurgy
Phone or fax: +302421074061
Description:

Extended CV

Dipl.Eng.: Mechanical Engineering (1982), Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece

M.Sc.: Naval Architecture & Marine Engineering (1985), Dept. of Ocean Engineering,

Massachussetts Institute of Technology-MIT, USA

M.Sc.: Physical Metallurgy (1985), Dept. of Materials Science & Engineering,

Massachussetts Institute of Technology-MIT

Ph.D.: Physical Metallurgy (1988), Dept. of Materials Science & Engineering,

Massachussetts Institute of Technology-MIT


Short CV - Research interests

Gregory Haidemenopoulos was born in Athens, Greece, 1959. He earned his diploma degree in Mechanical Engineering from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (1982), an M.Sc degree in Naval Architecture &Marine Engineering from MIT (1985), an M.Sc. degree in Metallurgy from MIT (1985) and  a Ph.D degree in Physical Metallurgy from MIT (1988).

 

During the period 1989-1992 he was director of the physical metallurgy group at the Metallurgical Industrial Research and Technology Center (Mirtec). Since 1992 he serves as Professor of Physical Metallurgy, at the Department of Mechanical Engineering of the University of Thessaly, where he is also the director of the Laboratory of Materials (LoM).

 

He has been Department head  during the period 2001-2003 and vice president of the University Research Committee (2000-2003). He is a member of ASM and TMS, and a founding member and president (2000-2004) of the Hellenic Metallurgical Society.

 

His research interest include the application of computational alloy thermodynamics and kinetics for the simulation of heat treatment and welding as well as for the design of new alloy compositions. He has been active in laser materials processing (welding, surface treatments, thin film deposition by LCVD and PLD), development of TRIP steels for the automotive industry and corrosion-induced hydrogen embrittlement of aluminum alloys for the aerospace industry.

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